Testimonials

Lynne Adrine
Lynne Adrine

Director, D.C. Graduate Program, Broadcast and Digital Journalism
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
Syracuse University

“What distinguishes the Workplace Integrity curriculum from other diversity/inclusion/equity programs I’ve seen is that it always recognized the value and importance of civility. Even at the start of the recognition of the #metoo movement, Workplace Integrity had a more expanded view, going beyond harassment and fighting against discrimination in myriad forms. The idea of creating an environment which can support the best performance for all employees is critical for the 21st century workplace.”


Jean Hodges
Jean Hodges

Senior Director of News Culture & Communications
Gannett

“As I’ve guided people through the Workplace Integrity training, I’ve seen people challenge their own biases and learn from one another about different approaches to difficult conversations. A healthy workplace is foundational for our staff to do their best work, and this training offers practical steps to get us there.


Amy Simons
Amy Simons

Associate Professor
John A. Walsh Faculty Fellow
Missouri School of Journalism

“I bring Workplace Integrity training into every aspect of our classroom and newsroom experience, having courageous conversations to build cultures of respect and trust among students, faculty and staff. When we use critical thinking to challenge assumptions the norm early in a young journalist’s career, we set the tone for journalism’s workplaces of the future.”


Jill Williams
Jill Williams

Deputy Editor/Features & Audience
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

“What sets Workplace Integrity apart is how it uses real newsroom experiences to spark honest conversation among peers. It goes beyond theory to real life. I’ve marveled at how people share deeply personal moments about racism, discrimination, sexism, and gender inequality in newsrooms and how that has impacted them. Some told about experiences for the first time. Their candor opened the eyes of many people who are now challenging themselves to do better and be better.”


Marie K. Shanahan
Marie K. Shanahan

Associate Professor of Journalism
University of Connecticut

“It will take time, toil, and resources to change the status quo in newsrooms and in journalism programs. There are some bright spots, though. One is the Freedom Forum’s Power Shift Project, which has been training journalism educators like me to help create workspaces free of harassment, discrimination, and incivility and ‘full of opportunity for those who have been traditionally denied it.’”