First Five: The First Amendment in the 21st century, banning panhandlers, Yik Yak, and Quentin Tarantino

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panel discussions

THE FIRST AMENDMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Newseum Institute
On Oct. 15, spiked presented a special, half-day conference on liberty, consisting of three lively and provocative discussions. In partnership with the Alliance Defending Freedom and supported by the Acton Institute, each session explored the troubles afflicting core First Amendment freedoms — speech, press and religion.


Commentary

WHEN WE BAN BEGGING WE TAKE AWAY THE FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS OF THE POOR

Matthew Segal, The Guardian
Panhandlers can make some people feel uncomfortable. But a listener’s discomfort, or even fear, rarely justifies restricting speech.


In the News

WOMEN’S GROUPS URGE COLLEGES AND GOVERNMENT TO REIN IN YIK YAK

Peter Schmidt, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Seventy-two women’s and civil-rights groups on Wednesday announced a campaign to enlist the federal government in pressuring colleges to protect students from harassment via anonymous social-media applications like Yik Yak.


QUENTIN TARANTINO, NYPD SPAR OVER POLICE BRUTALITY RALLY

Daniel Kreps, Rolling Stone
The New York Police Department officer union has called for a citywide boycott of Quentin Tarantino’s films following comments the director made during a rally against police brutality on Saturday.


IN TUNISIA, PRESS FREEDOM ERODES AMID SECURITY FEARS

Safa Ben Said, Committee to Protect Journalists
Hard-earned press freedom in Tunisia is under threat as journalists are squeezed between violent extremists and security services sensitive to criticism in the wake of deadly terror attacks. While Islamist militants threaten the media, the government introduces restrictive legislation and security forces legally harass and even assault journalists.


BIGGEST THREAT TO FREE SPEECH NOT ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES

Michael Roth, Huffington Post
In addition to sparking conversation, the op-ed also generated calls to punish the newspaper. Protests against newspapers, of course, are also part of free speech. But punishment, if successful, can have a chilling effect on future expression.


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