Video: Whistleblowers, Leaks and the Media

On Dec. 1, 2014, contributors to a new book, “Whistleblowers, Leaks and the Media,” discussed the tensions between the nation’s national security apparatus and journalists in the age of Snowden, Manning and Wikileaks.

Panelists:

  • Ellen Shearer, co-director, Medill National Security Journalism Initiative, Northwestern University
  • Gene Policinski, chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the Institute’s First Amendment Center
  • Paul Rosenzweig, founder, Red Branch Consulting PLLC
  • Harvey Rishikof, chair, American Bar Association Standing Committee on Law and National Security

Moderator:

  • Timothy McNulty, co-director, Medill National Security Journalism Initiative, Northwestern University

This program was sponsored by the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security, the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative and the Newseum Institute.

One thought on “Video: Whistleblowers, Leaks and the Media

  1. Wonderful panel. Thank you all for participating.

    A couple thoughts:

    1. Ellen mentioned the fact that ‘the media’ has not published all information provided by Snowden. It appeared this was a nod to ‘the media’ acting responsibly. I would offer that ‘the media’ has also published information that served little to no public purpose but potentially caused significant harm to national security (as identified by other media outlets). This counterpoint would be a nod to ‘the media’ acting irresponsibly . . or perhaps not having the complete information necessary to make the proper calculation of cost / benefit.

    2. One of the panelists mentioned the need to update the existing statutes regarding ‘leaks’ (the Espionage Act). The government agrees . . . but unfortunately, the dozens of attempts over the past three decades have all been met with significant pushback . . from the media. While ‘the media’ dislikes the Espionage Act, they appear to also dislike the idea of updating it.

    3. I believe Ellen misspoke when she said that James Risen was prosecuted for refusing to identify his ‘State of War’ source. He was subpoenaed to testify, but ultimately did not face contempt charges (or jail time) for refusing to testify about the identity of his source.

    Looking forward to reading the book.

    Gary Ross
    http://www.watchmenbook.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *